10minutes by Malyn Mawby

UPDATE: Due to Twitter’s buying and shutting down of Posterous, Malyn’s 10minutes sketchbook blog has been moved to WordPress, The Sketchbook Project 2012 – 10 minutes. Please visit the new site, enjoy Malyn’s sketchbook and sign her guestbook.

I am excited to present my first featured site, 10minutes, created by Malyn Mawby of Sydney, Australia. This post also features my first interview, which I conducted with Malyn about her site.

10minutes is a mini- or finite blog, having approximately twenty entries, but it is the context of these entries that makes it unique. The real work is the sketchbook the blog complements, documents and interplays with.

This sketchbook is the personal artwork and journey of Malyn as she explores her creative and playful side, and “endeavours to become a less frustrated artist”. The stories of Malyn’s sketches and journey are told in her blog.

The following video showcases her sketchbook. I think you will concur from this video that Malyn’s artistry and creativity are spectacular. Her blog showcases this work, Malyn’s thoughts and the meanings her sketches have to her in even more detail and with more love.

 

I had the honour of interviewing Malyn about her Sketchbook Project and this is what she had to say.

SU: How did it feel to put yourself “out there” for the world to see? Would you do it again?

MM: I was comfortable putting myself out there because I didn’t think it was particularly personal. Besides, I was always upfront that I wasn’t a true-blue artist; on the contrary, I was working on getting better. The blog auto-posted to twitter so I got feedback on both channels. The feedback was worth the putting myself ‘out there’ so-to-speak.

“I would definitely do it again. My youngest daughter (10 y.o.) voiced that she would join me, too. This is quite telling in itself, i.e. the effort I put in was well worth the results in more ways than one. She did clarify that she didn’t have to blog about it. 🙂

SU: Were there any surprises that you encountered during and after your project?

MM: Yes! I didn’t think that many of the entries would be inspired by my Twitter friends, most of whom I haven’t met in real life. Strangely enough, too, the realisation that ‘time is not my cage’ came as a surprise even though I suspected this to be true even before embarking on this project. Obviously, this played in my mind and influenced my choice of theme.

SU: You mentioned in your Prince and Picasso reflection that you realized Picasso’s work, and the work of all people who create things, is an autobiography. How did your sketchbook project capture your autobiography?

MM: It captured the people who moved or inspired me at the time. It hopefully showed the things that inspire me. It even captured an epiphany. That’s pretty awesome for something that only took 2 months.

SU: Okay, I would like to ask you an artist to artist question now. Do you feel that your sketchbook project captured story both in of itself and transcending to your life and the world around you? Did you see this story in your mind before you began each sketch or did it develop as you sketched?

MM: I didn’t expect this project to touch as many lives as it did. I should add that as a surprise, shouldn’t I? I think most artists only have a rough idea to begin with and then let loose, as part of the creative process. I did not know going into the process that Picasso would move me so, or that I was even going to a Picasso exhibition – that was such an impulsive thing we did as a family. I loved the idea of seeing inspiration everywhere and trying to capture a bit of that. I think I even ‘searched’ for inspiration and that’s a good thing!

SU: What advice and recommendations do you have for others – artists, professionals, learners, practitioners – who wish to journal their own journeys of activity?

MM: Inspiration is everywhere. Sometimes they come easily and sometimes we have to search. It’s so human to try to capture a bit of that somehow, through words, pictures, music, whatever. In this sense, we are all artists BUT not all of us make time to unleash the artist within. My advice then is this – time is not your cage – let the artist in you fly!

“And this applies to me as well!!

“This post “On Creativity – How?” is relevant.

SU: What did you want to share with your sketchbook and blog? What did you want to keep? You expressed a conflict about preserving the personal facets of your sketches. Now that you have had time to absorb your sharing of your work, do you feel you betrayed this preservation or ensured it?

MM: Creating the videos and final piece – mail art – helped me let go. Reflecting back, I don’t have many original pieces at home. I often make things to give away. It was a little tougher with this one because, as mentioned, it involved so many people and became quite a personal journey. It is no surprise that I got attached to it as I would to a personal journal.

“Interesting point on feeling betrayed. I think I would feel less true to myself – and thus feel betrayed – if I didn’t submit the sketchbook. Does that make sense? I was always going to let it go. I just didn’t realise it would be as hard as it was.

“In all authentic connections with people, we show a bit of ourselves; authentic connections are personal. I am negotiating the blurry line of what’s really personal and not to be shared BUT that is a different learning journey again. You can get a hint of that in this post, “Of hopes and dreams“.

For more of our interview, please visit my full Malyn Mawby interview document. And please also visit 10minutes. You will be spellbound.

 

While you are visiting 10minutes, sign Malyn’s guest book and let her know what you think. All comments there, here and on the interview are welcome.

Read my previous posts on Malyn’s Sketchbook Project.

UPDATE: Due to Twitter’s buying and shutting down of Posterous, Malyn’s 10minutes sketchbook blog has been moved to WordPress, The Sketchbook Project 2012 – 10 minutes. Please visit the new site, enjoy Malyn’s sketchbook and sign her guestbook.

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4 thoughts on “10minutes by Malyn Mawby

  1. Pingback: Thinking… Please Wait « Digital Substitute

  2. Pingback: Interview: The Blade of Ahtol with Dan Gillis | Stefras' Bridge

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